Belonging to Nobility

James 2:6-7: “But you have dishonored the poor. Is it not the rich who are exploiting you? Are they not the ones who are dragging you into court? Are they not the ones who are blaspheming the noble name of him to whom you belong?”

The phrase “dragging you into court” is the same phrase used by Paul taking followers of Jesus to court (Acts 8:3). There was some sort of physical force behind it. Coincidentally, Paul was dragged into court after he started following Jesus on numerous occasions (see Acts 16:19 for one example). Evidentially, the Christians that James is writing to were being exploited by the rich, but still showing favoritism when they entered into corporate worship. And when they were in court, the rich were not saying nice things about the Christians!

In verse 7, we see James is writing to followers of Christ. They “belong” to Jesus. This is the wording that is used when people get married, and the bride takes the husband’s name. You are a new creation in Christ, and you have a new family, ACT LIKE IT!

One significant implication of these verses (James 2:1-7) is that we are to view all people through the eyes of Christ. Love other Christians because Christ lives in them. Love non-Christians because Christ died for them.

Some questions to consider:

-Read 2 Corinthians 5:17-21. If you are “in Christ,” you belong to Christ! What implications does this have for the way you view yourself? What about how you see others?

-Why is the name of Christ considered “noble”?

Photo by William Krause on Unsplash

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